In this WP-Tonic round-table, we discuss the latest WordPress news and Web Accessibility. Accessibility is one of those things that is often neglected or misunderstood in web development. But making sure your website is accessible has benefits even for your regular customers.

We ask the panel what tools do they use to test a site for accessibility? Also, how do they bake accessibility testing into the development cycle? What are the key factors that developers must know about web accessibility in 2017?

We also discuss the various types of disabilities and impairments that your website should be accessible towards. Finally, we look at a long list of tools and resources for learning more about a11y accessibility, 508 compliance, and tools for testing web accessibility.

This is one of our most important episodes to date, and a topic that all designers and developers should research.

WordPress & Accessibility Coding Standards

This Weeks WordPress News Stories

1 – Renewing Medium’s focus?

https://wptavern.com/micro-blog-surpasses-kickstarter-funding-goal-set-to-launch-new-social-network-for-independent-microblogs

2 – W3Techs Ranks WordPress as the Fastest Growing CMS of 2016

https://wptavern.com/w3techs-ranks-wordpress-as-the-fastest-growing-cms-of-2016

3 – Matt Mullenweg Announces Tech and Design Leads for New Focus-Based Development Cycle

https://wptavern.com/matt-mullenweg-announces-tech-and-design-leads-for-new-focus-based-development-cycle

The WordPress Panel for Episode 155

Jackie D’Elia: from Jackie D’Elia Design

Lee Jackson: from LeeJacksonDev.com

John Locke: from Lockedown Design

Jonathan Denwood: from WP-Tonic.com

 

 

Things You Might Not Know About Accessibility and the Population

Color blindness affects 8% of all men, and 0.5% of all women around the world. If you do not test your website for color contrast, you are potentially creating a bad user experience for 4.5% of your customers.

1.3% of all Americans are legally blind. It is estimated that 10 million Americans are either legally blind or have vision impairment. This is 3.1% of all people in the United States. When your website is not readable by a screen reader, or if you use the low contrast typography that is currently popular, this is potentially alienating another 3.1% of your customer base.

Some people have motor function impairments. It is difficult for them to use a mouse to navigate your site. They may use the Tab key, or other assistive technology. Make sure that someone can go through your entire site and complete all necessary tasks using only the Tab key on the keyboard. It is also a good idea to make your tap or click targets easy to hit.

Over 5% of the world population is deaf or has hearing loss. According to the 2014 US Census, the population of each state is roughly between 2% and 4% deaf or hearing impaired. Videos or audio tracks ideally should have written transcripts. YouTube has made it easier for people to provide written transcriptions. Many podcasts are also starting to use sponsorship funds to provide written transcripts for the hearing impaired.

Full Transcript of Episode 155

Transcript of Episode 155: Accessibility is Part of the Job

John:    

Say it one more time. Now you’re not going to do it. Okay. Welcome to WP-Tonic 155. Today we’re talking all about accessibility. It’s part of the job. Let’s let the panel introduce themselves. Jackie, who are you?

 

Jackie:  

Jackie D’Elia. I own Jackie D’Elia Design in Charlotte, North Carolina and I work in WordPress primarily helping clients build their brands.

 

John:    

Excellent. Our friend from across the pond. Lee, introduce yourself.

 

Lee:      

Hi. I’m Lee. I run Angled Crown, which is a WordPress agency focused on designed agencies only. We build WordPress themes for designers, and we also run the WP Innovator podcast.

 

John:    

Sweet. That’s the new name for the agency?

 

Lee:      

That’s the new name. I’m filtering the new brand out slowly but surely in between pulling my hair out.

 

John:    

Jonathan, who are you?

 

Jonathan:           

I’m Jonathan Denwood. I’m the founder of WP-Tonic. We’re support and maintenance for WordPress and we help various people in the WordPress community. A trusted partner, aren’t we John?

 

John:    

Very trusted. Trusted by name. I’m John Locke. I run my own solo consultancy, Lockedown Design, and I help blue collar industries with their WordPress development and WooCommerce integrations.

 

Before we get into our main topic today, we had a few WordPress news stories. This is the first WordPress panel for the Tonic of 2017, and I think the most interesting story to me was not from WordPress, but actually from Medium. As many people know it’s a blogging platform. It was created by Ed Williams, who is also behind Twitter. He’s also an involved in Blogger. This post was talking about renewing Medium’s focus. They also laid off like 50 people from their staff.

 

Jonathan:           

They’re focusing all right.

 

John:    

Jackie, what did you think of this article? What does this mean for people who are on Medium?

 

Jackie:  

It was very vague to start with. I was confused about what they were going to be changing. There’s two thoughts I have on Medium. I like Medium to go read things because I like the layout. I think most news media sites, magazine sites are horrible with user experience because they’re constantly trying to download their ads, get everything in position. If I’m on my tablet and I go to a news site to read something I have to wait while it jumbles all around and things keep moving and I start to scroll up and then it reloads again and does something else.

 

I get so frustrated I don’t even want to read the article by that time. The thing I like about Medium was the front is great, it’s easy to read, it’s got a nice user experience, but the other side of that is, again, you are renting space for your content. A lot of us have concerns about that, especially those of us in the WordPress community that are using self-hosted sites. We have control of our content. We may be renting our hosting space but we are free to move our site, our files, our domain, wherever we want to go. I still think there’s questions about building a core brand on someone’s platform that you obviously have no control over.

 

As in just now, they’ve announced they’re going to be making changes. They haven’t really said what they are, but if you’re using Medium heavily for your marketing you got to be wondering, “What does this mean for my business and my brand?”

 

John:    

I think that’s an excellent point. Any place where you’re not owning your content free and clear it’s a little sketchy because there’s a possibility that they can disappear. I do love the typography there. I love the tools that they’ve created to write, and the reading experience is great, but I think the one thing that they’ve struggled with is the business model, and when you’ve taken VC money you got to have a return. Lee, do you see this the beginning of the end for Medium or are they going to be able to pivot out of this and somehow stick around?

 

Lee:      

That’s a good question. I remember being heavily involved with Blab when that launched, I remember, back in the day. Blab, rest in peace. I don’t know. When someone says, “We’re shifting focus,” it doesn’t really say what that shit focus is. They also point out that they’ve had to cut 50 staff. That just rings a billion alarm bells for me. I don’t know if they can change yet. I don’t understand what they can do. He talks about ads in the copy of everything’s being driven by ad revenue, etc. I don’t know how they’re not going to make money without driving either ad revenue or starting to charge people to have their content on there, and is there even enough content on there to monetize that. I don’t know how profitable this business could be.

 

I don’t understand their business model. I don’t understand how they’re making money right now, and how much money they are making. I don’t think I can comment. Just seeing this and seeing them announce something in such a vague, but trying to be positive way, just rings alarm bells for me, as in something might be a lot more wrong than they would let on. I don’t know. That’s me being grumpy.

 

John:    

I tend to agree with you because it’s a VC funded company. What we’ve seen is it’s either you’re aiming for a moon shot or nothing. Ultimately that might be what kills Twitter as well. In the long run, I think Twitter will survive a little bit longer than Medium will. It’s a great point, what you’ve said. In web publishing there’s really only been two proven models to even getting revenue and one is ads, and they seem dead set against that to their benefit, but the other is having some sort of subscription model or paywall as you see with major newspapers.

 

I guess the question is what are they going to do because free content with no monetization is not working, and it never could work. At some point there needs to be some money coming in. Jonathan, what are your thoughts on this Medium article?

 

Jonathan:           

It’s two parts. I want to do the flipping part first before I get on the serious bit. The flipping part is this statement, is pure San Francisco PR bullshit isn’t it?

 

John:    

Yes.

 

Jonathan:           

What do you read it? I just want to put my hand into the screen and grab this CEO and just slap him around a little bit for just writing this dribble. It’s utter PR dribble, isn’t it? It’s the kind of American shit that you just want to head butt them, don’t you just to waste your time reading it. I don’t know how many words it is but you read it and you just think, “Is this a different planet or does this idiot actually live on the same planet as me, and how did he become CEO of a major company in the Bay Area?” That’s the first part of it.

 

Lee:      

That’s a lot of pent up rage in there, mate. That all just spewed out of you.

 

Jonathan:           

It did. I just had to say it because I’ve been –

 

Lee:      

Just sending you hugs.

 

Jonathan:           

I’ve just been in meetings where I’ve been exposed to this Bay Area dribble language, and you just wonder –

 

Lee:      

I think you mean saying something without say something at all basically.

 

Jonathan:           

The stuff is there. You read it and you wonder, “What is he trying to say?” What he’s trying is, “We took VC money. It’s not generated … They pulled the cord and the runway is getting really short now and we’re chunking a load of people, and we don’t know how to make any money how of this thing.” You can say it in one paragraph couldn’t you?

 

John:    

You could have known that in 2012. [sarcastically] Honestly, who could have foreseen?

 

There has to be some sort of money and if you don’t have ads then it has to be something else. Facebook and Twitter, Google, and everything else, they’ve built their empire on selling ads. You have the eyeballs. They’re either going to add ads, or they’re going to try a subscription model. I really don’t see –

 

Jonathan:           

The subscription doesn’t work. They were going to add ads, weren’t they? They were going to do it.

 

John:    

That’s all they can do.

 

Jonathan:           

They just haven’t got the numbers. Everything else the panel said I totally agree with because actually they’ve done many things correct. It really is nice to read stuff on there. I don’t go to it very often. That’s probably one of the problems. They just didn’t get enough eyeballs. I think the other thing is be warned. This is the whole discussion between Open Source, WordPress and something like this. It’s really nice, but be warned. If you go all in with this, if it doesn’t pan out, like what happened with Blab, it can quickly go away, can’t it Lee? Just puff and it’s gone, isn’t it?

 

Lee:      

That’s the same with Meerkat as well, isn’t it? I know it’s different, but it’s like an app, and you’ve got people who are really rocking their marketing on it and they’ve got hundreds of followers like Blab. I was getting a good follow base, etc, good audiences, etc, and then pretty much within a couple of weeks it was gone. I know people were selling plug-ins that integrated with Blab. All of that just disappeared overnight because people were relying on some sort of third party service, which was VC funded. There was no business model.

 

It was like, “Here’s a great idea. Let’s use this money and see what happens,” and that unfortunately seems to be the way that a lot of these go, don’t they? There’s no real plan. There’s just, “Here’s a crazy good idea,” and then, “Let’s see how we make money later.” That’s the afterthought.

 

Jonathan:           

We utilized Blab for WP-Tonic and we like it, but I was very … I had a previous host who really delved in using Blab in a big way, Lee, and he thought he was going to become a Blab rockstar and he was doing a show every day. I was a lot more cautious because I could see the bandwidth that they were utilizing, which must have been costing them money. I just presumed they were going to go down the normal road, have a mixture of a pro version, and on the free one it was ad driven. Something like that.

 

When they announced the end of Blab they bunged up the CEO of that company, and I apologize I forget his name. He posted a similar bit of nonsense, didn’t he? When you read it you had to read it eight times before you could make any sense of it.

 

John:    

That’s the difference between running a regular business and a VC funded business. In a VC funded business you’re looking for explosive growth the odds are stacked against you. Yes, sometimes you’ll have a moonshot like Uber or a Facebook, or something like that, but more often than not you’re regulated to the graveyard of ideas. Look at App.net, Ello, any one of a hundred other things that were going to disrupt blogging or disrupt –

 

Jonathan:           

Actually John I think it’s worse than that. I think there’s a number of businesses, if they had to been boot strapped to a more traditional funding, which wouldn’t be available, they would have been really nice businesses, profitable businesses, but because that was the only funding option to them or they went into an incubator, they went down the VC and it destroyed them.

 

John:    

In something like this where you’re giving away free stuff and you’re just getting users the real money is in the user data. Let’s be honest, Facebook has perfected that to a science. Any of these social networks that are thriving, or any of these blogging platforms that are thriving, the money is in the user data, which is leveraged against ads. We’ll see.

 

Jonathan:           

On to the next one. It just got me going, the language of it. I read it three times and every time I read it I got more confused and more frustrated with it.

 

Lee:      

Just learn from him and next time we need to fire a client write a letter like that to them. They won’t be sure if they’ve been fired or if they’ve been, you know.

 

Jonathan:           

Come on, Lee. You read it. Could you make any sense of it at all?

 

Lee:      

No. Hence, the comment before this thing in flack. I was like, “What? Anyway.” Sorry, carry on.

 

Jonathan:           

I’m sorry. Are we interrupting your drinking? I apologize.

 

John:    

Definitely a second story. W3 Techs is ranked WordPress’s the fastest growing CMS of 2016. Just for reference, some of the other CMS’s content management systems that were on this list were Joomla, Drupal, Magneto, Blogger, Shopify, Blogger, Squarespace, Open Cart, FrontPage, some other ones that are lesser known. It continued to get the share of the CMS market. As we know, WordPress is powering 27% of all websites. Right now it has 58.5 market share of CMS’s.

 

According to this, Shopify and Squarespace were the next biggest increases in usage, but to put this in perspective it only has .6% if the CMS market and Squarespace is .5. Their percentage went up and Joomla and Drupal flapped, completely flat, .1% increase. Thoughts on this Jackie?

 

Jackie:  

I’m happy to see WordPress is doing well in that. The only thing that I would comment on in that list was several of them were eCommerce related CMS’s. I don’t think you’re really comparing apples to apples in that comparison. Like Shopify, I would rather see a comparison of WordPress sites with WooCommerce compared to Shopify. Then you could see what the growth is on those compared, but other than that it’s pretty clear that WordPress is continuing to grow and the others, Joomla and Drupal are holding their own, but they’re not really making any headway.

 

John Locke:        

I agree. They’re just flat growth, and WordPress is definitely chewing up more of the market share. I like what you said too. It would be good to have a separate chart where you compare of-

 

Jackie:  

I don’t think that WooCommerce is more prominent now, now that it’s part of Automattic. I think that’s going to propel the next level for WordPress as far as installs go. There’s going to be a lot more people who are going to be more comfortable of using WooCommerce. I ran an eCommerce store for 10 years. I used a Yahoo store platform back in early 2000’s when I started that.

 

WordPress wasn’t an option. I was using WordPress for blogging at the time, but it wasn’t an option to sell, and until recently I really still wasn’t really that comfortable with that whole process of selling products through WordPress. It’s just a little more cumbersome. I found it easier to use like a Yahoo store platform, or something like, maybe a Shopify, or there’s a big commerce. There’s several of them that are really geared toward selling products and they have a hosted panel and it’s a lot easier.

 

With WooCommerce, and I’m sure it’s going to change now as time goes by. I think they’re really going to make these improvements. They’re going to offer a hosted solution for it, and I think that, that’s going to be very competitive and I think that will offer some growth.

 

John:    

I think those are great points. Something I wanted to ask Lee is another part of this article that was intriguing to me is it says that the site stats module in WordPress jet pack is actually the third fastest growing traffic analytics, behind Google analytics and the Yandex analytics. What do you make of that? Is jet pack being successful in it’s mission to give people the tools to launch a website quickly?

 

Lee:      

I don’t know. I actually can’t stand jet pack to be honest. Oh, I’m getting lots of approving nods. I’m in a good … That’s full nods all around. Is that full nods all around? Right, well I’ll shut up then. No, I’m joking. I’m joking. The problem with jet pack is, is people will tend to install it believing they need to install it because it’s from WordPress. They’ll install it. They’ll then follow the instructions that they have to connect their WordPress account, etc, because it nags them to do so. They think, “I need this because I need a contact form and I need social sharing icons, or whatever,” because they’ve got a few cool things lumped in there that you can enable it etc.

 

By the nature of installing on all of that, that’s activating their statistics program, which nobody’s actually looking at. It’s just part of this jet pack thing that they’ve installed that they’re probably just using for a contact form. I’m not sure whether Jetpack itself is being used, and the fact that it’s also using visuals anyway from Google Analytics. Does that even count? I’m not sure. I’m sure it’s using the API of Google when I last looked at it. I was quite surprised about jet pack to be honest.

 

The thing that did surprise me about this is the fact that FrontPage is on there.

 

John Locke:        

.4%, actually right behind Squarespace, which is –

 

Lee:      

Amazing. Last version in 2003 and still rocking.

 

Jackie:  

I was actually thinking, was that the FrontPage that I remember? Or is this some other FrontPage that’s just –

 

Jonathan:           

No, it’s the FrontPage that you remember, yes.

 

Lee:      

I googled a gazillion times just in case, but this appear to be FrontPage. Last version 2003.

 

Jonathan:           

What a piece of shit that was.

 

Jackie:  

You’re on a roll Jonathan. We will not be clicking the clean box on this podcast episode.

 

John:    

No, we won’t. We will not.

 

Lee:      

This is an explicit podcast. Otherwise, I’ll just try and beep when I think he’s going to swear. Beep, beep, beep, beep, beep.

 

Jonathan:           

You’re just bringing up stuff that’s getting me going.

 

Jackie:  

This is WP-Tonic Raw. This is good.

 

Lee:      

Welcome to after hours. Anyway, carry on.

 

John:

WP-Tonic, After Dark.

 

Jonathan:           

Too early really.

 

Lee:      

That was a good one.

 

Jonathan:           

There’s are why because I’m in the morning. I’m on water. That’s what’s getting me going.

 

Jackie:  

Oh my goodness.

 

Jonathan:           

I thought what was really interesting was Squarespace.

 

Lee:      

You mean spare space?

 

Jonathan David:

Let me finish, Lee. Squarespace, it’s growth. What was interesting Wix wasn’t there at all. I’m sorry to swear again. [laughs]

What Jackie and Lee said, that’s growing. Jackie’s comment, you got a lot of eCommerce’s systems there. That’s not unfair or fair, but it doesn’t really give it a clear picture really. It’s a bit like that previous story we discussed. It’s not clarifying anything really, is it? It’s interesting, that Squarespace. I’m not surprised Drupal or Joomla, especially Drupal. It appeals to this hardcore PHP IT quasi-education, government set up.

 

You hear this or WordPress isn’t secure and nonsense that you hear often for that particular source. No, I’m not surprised about that. I think now that you mentioned it, Matt [Mullenweg] saw the real competition from things like Squarespace. I think that’s really linked to our previous conversations about Jackie and myself and Lee about the editor needs to be really improved. There’s obvious areas that need to bumped up. I think you saw there was going to be movement there in Matt’s speech at WordCamp USA. That’s on the roadmap. I think the problems have been identified.

 

The other thing is the WooCommerce. Hopefully this quarter, or at least next quarter, it’s going to be integrated with wordpress.com. That’s going to be interesting, and finally, I’m not going to say too much about Jetpack because I’ve said quite a bit about it, but I’ll just say I totally agree with Lee’s comments about it.

 

John:    

That sums it up. We got time to just blast through this last story. Just quick thoughts on this. Matt Mullenweg announces the tech design leads for the new design focused development cycles of WordPress. This comes hot on the heels of the WordCamp 2016 USA announcement that they’re going away from having quarterly development cycles and they’re going to be focusing more on things like the editor, the customizer, and just the general UI. What are your thoughts on this, Jackie?

 

Jackie:  

I think that’s good. I’m liking that, rather than just trying to cram things into specific time periods. I think it’d be better to focus on something that really needs improvement like the editor and just work on that, and build a release around that if that’s what that actually means.

 

John:    

Yes, definitely. Lee, thoughts on this. What things should they be working on at this point?

 

Lee:      

I think one of the areas is the editor. If you look at WordPress right back at day one, versus WordPress now at that screen, other than it looking prettier it still really …. Shut up. It still really is –

 

Jonathan:           

No, I’m going to agree with you.

 

Lee:      

It really is the same. I thought you were saying it doesn’t look pretty. I like it. It looks pretty now. It’s looker than it did. It is actually really the same. It’s still TidyMC, a later version, version 4 or whatever it is now, great. It doesn’t really do much. Short codes are a pain in the backside. Some of the options that are coming out to help manage short codes are kind of cool.

 

If you look at visual builders, which obviously is a touchy subject with Jonathan, but being able to see what you’re editing live is far better, and they do touch on that in the article about that sort of potential of being able to see it live, because short codes and some sort of short code previewer sound cool, but they just give you a non-design specific representation of what’s going to happen in the front end. You still have to press save and then go ahead and check it out before … Go and hit preview or go and have a look at it, etc. I think that whole editor area is essentially the same experience. You’re almost expecting any CMS you go in and you hit this square box with a little word section at the top at looks like Microsoft Word-

 

Jonathan:           

Can I say something Lee? The reason why this is all happened really, this fixation with the Customizer. The people in WordPress keep pushing it and it’s just a heap of rubbish. It’s a heap of crap basically. This fixation to keep pushing and keep insisting that people got to use it. I never use it unless I’m dealing with something that forces us to use the piece of crap. It should have been got rid of and more sensible minds should have listened to. This is bigger issues. As long as this fixation with the Customizer keeps going nothing fundamentally is going to improve in this situation. That’s the problem.

 

Lee:      

I’m not sure composure’s got anything to do with it though in theory.

 

Jonathan:           

Sorry?

 

Lee:      

The industry agrees that [Visual] Composer is terrible and the things like ThemeForest that has forced composer to be bundled in with multiple applications. I think though this one square block of you can edit your text here and you’re going to have to use short codes or something else or some sort of other visual builder to help you see what the output is going to be is a major issue inside of WordPress, but also in any CMS. If you look at Drupal it’s the same. It’s a square grid. You look in Joomla it’s a square grid.

 

It would be great to see something new and ground breaking in WordPress for the post and page editor, be it visual, be it some clever take on short codes, don’t care, but I would love someone to come at this problem at a completely new fresh angle because I can’t even think of how to improve it other than maybe something like Beaver Builder, but that’s focused as me as a development, not necessarily great for people who want to create content.

 

This is like a podcast in its own because then you’re going to talk about who’s using WordPress? Is it the content creators that we should be focused on who are writing blogs, or is it the big companies that are creating really complex websites? It’s difficult.

 

Jonathan:           

I think Jackie in some previous episode really got it right. I don’t think a lot of people, and I’ll be interested in seeing what Jackie says about this, I don’t really think people want a whole thing like Beaver Builder really, a lot of users. They want something where they move something and when they see it live it actually matches up with what they’re doing. They get totally frustrated don’t they Jackie?

 

Jackie:  

The challenge is, is that we’re building out sites. We have a style sheet that has all the styles in there, the fonts that are being used, the colors that are being used, the widths. Everything is done in a style sheet, and then you get a page builder, and then you override all of that, and you start to get a point where you’re like, “What do I really need to put in the style sheet anymore if you’re going to be just able to change everything on the fly inside the content?” That’s the challenge.

 

I never use the visual editor when I’m writing a post because I just see everything in html, but I know that there’s many, many users that don’t see things that way at all. They’re looking at things visually and that’s where it falls short. It’s not something that you can create content and effectively mark it up in the visual editor. If you delete something you’ll find you go and look at the text editor half of it’s still there, part of the code is still there. It becomes a mess.

 

 

The more visual editing you do the worse the text one gets when you pop back in there and take a look. When I first saw that, that was why I just migrated away from using the visual editor. The challenge is clients that are using this site to write content, they can’t apply styles to things, and you have pre-done styles for them, but it’s the integration of your style sheet into the editor, and to be able to give them the flexibility to use the styles that are in the design the site, and that’s where it breaks I think.

 

That’s where the big challenge is, is where people start using colors, they underline things, they do things that are not appropriate, which is actually a good topic for accessibility as well. That’s where I think things break down. Lee’s perfectly right in saying, “I don’t really know how to fix that problem,” because it’s like you’re building a site, you’re designing it and everything all in a style sheet that’s completely separate from that, but then you want to be able to go in there and apply a bunch of design styles and changes in a visual editor that doesn’t work very well.

 

John:    

There you go. I think we’re up against our break. When we come back from our break we’re going to be talking about web accessibility. It’s part of the job. It’s not an extra. Back after the break.

 

 

Lee:      

I want to just start doing a cheesy ring like, [starts singing]. Sorry, carry on.

 

John:    

We’re back from the break and we’re talking web accessibility. I know that Jackie, like you, on your podcast that you just had a whole show, a whole episode about accessibility. Why is accessibility important?

 

Jackie:  

From two points, I think, two main points. One is, it is really nice to be inclusive and to make your site as accessible for everyone that wants to visit it. The other is, it’s basically writing good code, which is always, and good content, which is always good for your SEO and for how search engines see your site. From that perspective not doing it property is actually contributing to a defect on your end, especially on search results.

 

You’ll a have lot clients that will say, “I really don’t need any of that. I don’t have anybody that uses that,” or, “I’m not concerned about that.” Rian Rietveld was on my podcast. We had an episode about why accessibility matters and one of the things that she said that really strikes home is she goes, “Google is deaf and blind.” Think about that for a second and think about how search engines see and hear your site, and read your content, and think about that and having properly formatted semantic structure, how important that is for search engines to figure out what your site is about.

 

John:    

I think that’s an excellent point because if you’re a blind person, if you’re using something like JAWS or assisted technology, they’re basically consuming your page the same way that Google is, which is just by using a text reader. This is exactly how search engine crawlers work. Lee, how often do clients come to you when you’re doing a project for them and actually request accessibility? Is it something that they think about a lot or is it just something that you guys include just as part of the job?

 

Lee:      

We tend to just include it as part of the job for them anyway. We do have, I would say, about 20% of all of our clients would stipulate in the project brief that they would want it to be accessible. Some of them will even request specific … There’s a few apps as well online like Read it Out Loud, etc, that’s where people can tap the button and it will start to read the copy out loud to people, etc. We tend to build it in just for our own sanity. We never have time to do it for ourselves, but we’re certainly able to do it for the clients because we’re investing in creating good code that we know that we can support that’s clean, that’s going to be compatible for the future. That saves our butts, therefore, doing that is good for ourselves regardless or someone who is visually impaired trying to read the website.

 

Then on the flip side, their client one day could be a blind billionaire who accesses their website and reads some of their content and makes a connection. I know that sounds deaf, but seriously, it is good to be inclusive. We believe that we should be providing an accessible website. For our own site we try to minimize the errors that we do in W3C, and we’ve been working through something called AChecker, which is pretty good to get an AA rating. We’re still going through that on our new site. We’re launching the new brand.

 

We’re trying to get zero known problems on the new site, and we’re also following their advice with regards to things like color, contrast, etc. If you’ve got two colors in your brand, you got text over a specific color, it’s harder for some people to see who might be color bind, etc. You either need to change that or make it dead easy for them in their software to be able to change that. Not having images of text on top of a background etc, that they can’t switch out the color schemes of etc, all sorts of things.

 

20% of clients, I’d say, are interested in it. The rest don’t care. We build it in as an agency for our own sanity to be good. The benefit always is clean code means easier to support websites. If I get hit by a bus, somebody else can come in and look at what we’ve done and understand what I’ve done. Same with any members of my team. If they disappear one day, because we’ve all stuck to the way it’s done as it were, it’s a lot easier to support a website, to fix something, etc.

 

John:    

Definitely. That’s excellent advice. Jonathan, what’s been your experience with clients? Do many of them ask for accessibility as a baked in feature or is it just something that they don’t even think about?

 

Jonathan:           

It really depends on what the client is really. Doesn’t it, John? Really, doesn’t it? If it’s a small to low or medium client they wouldn’t even know what you were talking about. It wouldn’t even register on their radar. If you’re talking about a government department or a medium sized business between 50 to 100 people, it might be on their radar. It depends on the marketing director, doesn’t it really John? Does it? Obviously, Lee and Jackie are both professional web designer developers. They would do their best dependent on budget and time restraints because they’re professionals.

 

I think on the bigger jobs you and John, we would do our best … There’s the other side of my business where we’re dealing with commercial WordPress themes from ThemeForest where we’re dealing with Divi. It’s like a different world. What Lee and Jackie were talking about it doesn’t really register. I feel it hasn’t really moved on. I think some of this is … I don’t think it’s been a really big enough … It’s a shame that Morten couldn’t join us because he would definitely inside perspective this. I just don’t think in WordPress, in the WordPress code development team, it really hasn’t really been a very important thing. The language packs have been, and getting it internationalized has been more soon as more important than usability. I just don’t agree with it and I never have agreed with it.

 

I met Morten at the last … We met personally at the last Word Camp Us at San Francisco. He engaged Matt in this conversation and he basically got brushed off really. He got brushed off. I don’t think it’s moved on a lot, and I don’t think it’s really that important still and it’s a shame really.

 

Lee:      

It’s funny, the guys behind Elementor, which is a visual builder, when I approached them on W3C, their opinion was that they’re not really that fussed about it. All they care about is speed. Sorry, Jackie. Back to you. That was just an opinion from someone else I’d heard.

 

Jackie:  

I just wanted to point out Rian did mentioned to me that she’s on the accessibility team, the WordPress accessibility team, and they are making progress. She’s quite happy with some of the changes that have been going on and I look at that as a gauge of if she’s happy with some of those things then that’s probably a good sign, that they’re making some progress. The challenge I think is, is that accessibility looks like on big thing, and it looks like it’s something you have to tackle this whole large thing.

 

What I’d like to say is you can break it up into very, very small easy wins. Little things like I wrote a post last year about don’t use headings to make text bigger. It’s just understanding that H1, H2, H3, H4, they have semantic meaning. They’re not used for styling. If you get your mind around that and say, “I just want to make this sentence bigger or this paragraph bigger, I’ll just wrap it in an H3 or an H4,” and doing things out of order with an H2 is not inside of an H1, and an H3 is not inside of an H2, is confusing for the browser when it reads it. It’s very confusing for screen readers and for those who are using a keyboard to navigate.

 

You want to make sure. That’s another easy win is just making the steps to make sure that your website is keyboard accessible and that you’re using focus and not just hover. Hover you’re using for your mouse. Focus is for your keyboard. You want to make sure that you’re putting those of those elements in your style sheet when you’re doing it. Those are just simple things that you can do. It’s not real complicated. The biggest one is images. Just poorly, people not using the ALT tag for their images and explaining what the image is.

 

Basically if you go with that premise that Google’s blind and can’t see, it comes across the image and it goes, “Okay, image. I don’t know what this is. I don’t know how this is part of the content. I don’t know why this is here.” You have some images that are decorative. You don’t want to use an alt tag on those because they don’t matter. They’re just purely decorative for a visual user, but images that actually add value to the content, or are now part of the content, you want to have an alt tag in there that says what that is, women sitting on a red bench in the park, and then you know that’s what Google would see, that’s what a screen reader reads.

 

Those are just some simple things that anybody who’s writing their own content or doing basic implementation on a WordPress site can do to make their site more SEO friendly and more accessible.

 

John:    

I love that I love … Go ahead, Lee.

 

Lee:      

I was going to say, sorry mate, it’s actually a really good point. Do we get, and do I get, too wrapped up in making everything absolutely 100% AA Checked or should I really be focusing on the content and educating the client with regards to things like header one, header two tag structures, etc? Am I overthinking things? It just makes me think because really do go to the nth degree for most clients, because most clients will have the budget for it to get full marks across the board on every single checker that’s available for them, and it’s a pain in the ass to be honest, and maybe sometimes I’m maybe over focused on it. When Jackie points out there actually just some simple things you can do on the bit that matters, which is the content.

 

Jonathan:           

I figure it really depends on the kind of client you’re dealing with, doesn’t it Lee? If you’re dealing with an education or Quasar government body, you really got to pull out. There’s got to be the budget or you don’t under the budget. In the medium long term view you’d be damaging the credibility of your business if you’re dealing with those kind of entities. I’m not sure if I’m right about this. If you go into the theme directory of WordPress is there any indication that any of these themes are accessibility friendly? I doubt. I doubt if you, as a general user, you had some concern and you wanted some information about particular themes, there’s nothing.

 

There’s no style rating. There’s so promotion of it. We’re moving forward on this. I’ve heard that conversation really, Jackie, for over five years. I’m a little bit frustrated by it to be quite truthful. What opened my eyes was when it came to the internationalization and the packs, how that was pushed and how usability isn’t. I think that’s more the reality at the present moment, Jackie. [Or, she’s gone].

 

John:    

I wanted to follow up with something you just asked about there. There is a feature filter for accessibility ready.

 

Jackie:  

Yes, there is.

 

John:    

A translation ready. I’ll be honest, I really don’t know what that means, if it’s actually accessible or if it’s ready for you to do. If you put accessibility ready and translation ready together there’s only 102 themes.

 

Jonathan:           

John, I wonder if that theme from GoDaddy that was eviscerated, I wonder if that was accessibility friendly.

 

John:    

I don’t even remember what it was called. There’s literally tens of thousands of themes on the repo.

 

Lee:      

I have just spot checked one as well. Vanilla Milkshake it’s called, and it’s just passed AA checker. That’s very impressive.

 

John:    

Very good.

 

Jackie:  

One of the things that designers struggle with too is they feel like they’re using their freedom and their flexibility on colors and design layouts in order to try to make contrast ratios. That is a challenge as well. You’re going to run into that, and you may have some clients that are more concerned about that than not. That’s something to take into consideration as well.

 

I know when I first started going through my theme on my site and making sure that links were underlined, I ended up using a boarder bottom with a dash or a dotted, which is very faint, but when you hover over it, it goes away and you can see it. It looks like there’s a link there, and you obviously change the colors as the text as well, but I didn’t like that hard underline on there. When you’re going through it, it was very disruptive to the design flow for me.

 

I found an alternative solution for that and I’m using a boarder bottom on there. It’s something that’s a little bit more subtle, but it is there. When you hover over it you do want more than just a color change because some folks are color blind or have difficulties seeing a distinction between colors. When you hover over a link, or you go through on the keyboard and keyboard to it, you want something else to change. At that point you just take that little dotted line that’s underneath and you make it go away, and then that helps with the visual cue that you are in the right place and this is a link that you can click on or hit enter on.

 

Jonathan:           

Funny enough, when I went to design school one of the things they taught you if you multi tap a design in photo shop you just always just go mono, remove all the colors and see the contrast. That was one of the things my instructor always hammered in your brain. Do a mono version and then see the contrast. That helped when you went to the full color because then you could see the contrast. That’s a few years ago. Oh God, I’ve got old.

 

John:    

I do agree with that. That’s one thing. There’s so many different types of accessibility that you have to consider, and as Jackie mentioned before, like the alt tags, what a lot of people do is they’ll just put the keywords in there again instead of describing the scene. I was guilty of that up until probably this last year. That’s something that I’ve tried to do better with, is when I’m using alt tags actually describe what the image is.

 

Jackie:  

Yes. It’s like tell Google what it is. It’s like Google can’t see and go, “Hey, I see this box here. What is it?” That’s your alt tag is, this is a women sitting on a red bench in the park, and it goes, “Oh okay, now I understand.” It’s not stuffed with keywords that you’re trying to rank your page for.

 

Jonathan:           

What kind of plug-ins that you can install that check pages?

 

Jackie:  

There’s the WP accessibility program by Joe Dolson that … They do even in WordPress now warn you about your image. If it needs an alt tag or not, and you can check it and say, “No, it’s decorative.” There’s a good cue there for people to when they’re uploading their image. One thing I learned from Rian that I didn’t even know is you don’t have to put “photo of” in the actual alt tag because it already knows that it’s an image. You don’t need those words in there. You just need a description of the picture.

 

Jonathan:           

I think both you and what Lee have said … I think in some ways people over do it, and they can improve the situation, which would improve their SEO enormously by what you said, Jackie. The contrast, the colorblindness, I think that’s really down to designer and not really of the theme in some ways. I think that last 20%, what Lee’s talking about, which you got to do if you’re dealing … If you got the budget you should do it on everything. It’s really about, at the present moment, it is budget and time driven. When you’re dealing with government agencies, quasi-agencies, major businesses, I think they could expect that to be done.

 

Jackie:  

Right, but it’s not an all or nothing thing. For most clients part of at least starting to get those easy wins is going to be much more beneficial for them, and from an SEO perspective as well, than not doing it. It’s like, “Well, this is the giant thing. I don’t want to mess with it, and I’m just going to ignore it.” Take it all apart and start looking at all the different things that you can do, the simple little things, and that’s like 80% of this whole thing, is just these simple things. It’s like making sure your forms have labels. That’s all there really is. That’s the 80% of this whole thing is if you focus on those.

 

Those are things that not only you have to do as a designer and developer building out the site, but you need to educate your clients on how to properly use it when they’re writing content as well. I remove the H1 from the visual editor. It’s not in there. If they want to go to the text editor and hard code it in you can do that, but I removed that code so that they’re not doing double and triple H1’s on a page, and then you just remind them. When you give them your hand off document, you might want to remind them about the proper way to structure their content.

 

It goes back to the days before there was the web where you were writing a table of contents and an outline and a document and it had a specific flow.

 

Jonathan:

The only thing I would say about that, Jackie, we recently, this week, been live on iTunes. This morning we did an interview with Nate [Wright]. Didn’t we, John?

 

John:    

Theme of the Crop.

 

Jonathan:           

Theme of the Crop.

 

John:    

Nate Wright.

 

Jonathan:           

It was a great interview. Most of his customer base, all of the developers, he can tell by the questions that he gets in the forum, the support forum. He said he can tell that most of these developers, because of the questions they were asking, didn’t he John? That they were very stressed out. They had underbid for a restaurant website and the expectation of the client totally out met their technical ability and the commercial restraints. When I was listening to you Jackie, I was listening to that interview and the reality of a lot of people find themselves. That’s where the mismatch sometimes goes really or am I just dribbling John?

 

John:    

No. I think you’re correct with that. There is a mismatch of expectations sometimes. I’ll just say this, a lot of times people will … Say with focus styles and cover styles, there’s a great example. A lot of times people will have the focus styles else taken out. What I’ve started to say, if you focus on a link and it has the outline, the dotted outline, they’ll be like, “No, we don’t want that.” One thing that I’ve tried to do this last year with developing themes is make the hover styles and the focus styles the same. You’d get the same effect as if you were tabbing through a site, you would get the same effects as if you’re hovering.

 

I think that’s a good test too, to see can you just use your tab key and get through your site and do all the things that you want to do. That is a good accessibility test to begin with. Let’s do our last break and then let’s go through some tools that you can use to test for and improve your accessibility on your site.

 

Jonathan:           

Sounds fine to me.

 

John:    

Okay. We’ll be back after the break and finish up our last segment on accessibility. We’re coming back from the break and we’re talking web accessibility in your WordPress site. There’s so many different types of accessibility that you have to be aware of. There are people that use a screen reader that can’t see. There’s people that just have vision impairments. Using the pale gray text on a white background is just no good there, because a lot of people can’t read it. That’s a part of accessibility. There are people who are colorblind and they can’t read your page because the contrast is bad.

 

There’s many different things. What are some of the tools that you use, Jackie, to test for accessibility and what are some of the ones that you recommend?

 

Jackie:  

The one that I recommend that I really like that Rachel Carden wrote was … She wrote a plugin to do the accessibility, the WP Accessibility toolbox. It’s built right into your site. There’s a little eyeglass that shows up down at the lower bottom left of your screen and you can click on it, and you can go through and test for contrast ratios, headings, lots of different things while you’re building out your site. I think that’s really handy.

 

Joe Dolson has a plugin, WP Accessibility, which is really handy too. If you have a theme that doesn’t have any accessibility options in there, that it can help set up all of that for you through the plug in. Those would be the two that I would recommend that you start with. Then there’s a lot of online web places that you can go and put in your URL and it will check it as well.

 

John:    

Excellent. Lee, what are some of the tools that you test for? What are some of the things that you guys go through on your checklist for accessibility?

 

Lee:      

There’s only two main tools that we would use. I’d be interested to check out the ones that Jackie recommended. We’ll use the W3C validator online. That’s w3c.validator.org I think. We’ll use that. We actually use that throughout the entire process. Every time we’re about to do a GitHub commit, we’ll also be running the validator check. We’ve actually got into the habit of knowing what the validator is going to score us negatively against. We tend to find quite often we just pass with flying colors, which is nice.

 

We also, at the same time, every week we will use AA Checker throughout the project, that’s aachecker.ca, and that’s going to give us an AA grade, which is going to give us for all of the actual problems. For example, a very common problem might be having a label, but not saying what the label is for. You got to label for an input, but which input? Google has no idea and neither does the screen reader know which input is the name, when someone wants to fill in their name on your form. AA Checker is really good for stuff like that.

 

 

I guess the only negative with AA Checker is usually they’ll give you a tap of possible issues, and that is usually always 200, and it’s full of stuff about colors that sometimes we just don’t understand. I was quite interested in taking a look at the plugins that Jackie mentioned, because all we will ever worry about on AA Checker are the ones that are labeled as actual problems, but it does bother me that there could be contrast issues, which are not classed as problems. They’re classed as potential problems. You still get your AA Checked thumbs up.

 

 

You’ve met your criteria on your contract with the client, but the fact that there are still some issues there that are potential issues, it always does bother me. I’d love to learn of new tools all the time instead of the only two we’re using right now.

 

John:    

I’m glad you mentioned the W3C Validator. That’s definitely a good one. Excellent, excellent. We’ll have all of these in the show notes as well, and we’ll make a list for the website as well. Johnathan, any tools you want to recommend?

 

Jonathan:           

No, not really. I think the ones that Jackie, I’m going to look at. The ones at Lee mentioned we have utilized. I think in defense, I think the things that we work on John the budget allows, but the other side of my business, we’re maintenance and we’re dealing with a totally different … The only way I push it is the areas which Jackie outlined because they really do effect SEO, and it’s much easier to get the client to agree when we do see obvious problems. We do tend to do SEO basic audits. When we see some really major problems or point them out it’s just easier to get them sorted out, but when you’re talking about contrast, that’s hard to sell with the type of clients I’m dealing with on that side of the business.

 

Jackie:  

That goes back to what I was saying is, it’s not an all or nothing thing. There are easy wins that you can do that definitely help your client with their SEO, and that’s a positive for you then. That’s something that you can offer. That’s something they’re going to be very receptive to.

 

Jonathan:           

Yes. I totally agree Jackie. I normally agree with everything you say, don’t I Jackie, because you’re normally right aren’t you?

 

John:    

One thing that I want to mentioned, it’s the a11yproject.com/resources.html, and that has a whole list of tools that you can use to both test for accessibility and resources for learning about accessibility. I think that is a good place to start if you’re just learning about it. Another one that I want to mention is the acolorfiler.wicline.org, and there is where you can test a certain URL for different types of colorblindness. There’s three types of colorblindness. There’s a red/green, yellow/blue, and then there’s one other, but basically you can test and see what it’s going to look like.

 

Jonathan:           

Blue/red, but that’s a different kind of blind.

 

John:    

You’re right I think.

 

Jonathan:           

I was being sarcastic. Sorry.

 

John:    

Also http://www.color-blindness.com/2006/04/10/colorblind-web-page-filter/ 100 hue color vision test. Like I said, these are things you don’t think about like are people colorblind. When we talk about contrast, especially in web design today, this low contrast thing is a fad and it’s really super hard to read, even if you have 20/20 vision. I can only imagine what it’s like for people with colorblindness, or if they have just low vision or less than perfect vision, it’s just really tough. Thinking about those things is-

 

Jackie:  

I agree. That goes to user experience as well though. That ties together. Those thin, thin faded fonts may look cool, but they’re very hard to read and they’re hard on your eyes. I love it when I go to a site and I can read the text easily. It’s big. It’s easy to read. It’s formatted. We were talking about Medium as another good reading experience. While those designing things are cool, think about what the experience is going to be for the user. I think you’ll get more traffic on your site if you do.

 

John:    

One thing, and I actually just ran my site though this, I actually added something not that long ago that I need to go fix now, but thewave.webaim.org site, you can actually test any URL. It will give you a list of what’s error, what’s an alert, the structural elements, the html and URL elements contrast errors. Jackie, your site’s pretty excellent there. Kudos to you.

 

Jackie:  

It’s a process.

 

John:    

It is a process.

 

Jonathan:           

I think the SEO part is easy, but what most clients, and maybe you have brought up, that they’re not aware of how many people do suffer from colorblindness. They really don’t know. It is a major issue, isn’t it? If somebody can’t see something that easily.

 

John:    

It’s quite a few. When you really add up all the people who suffer from different things, either colorblindness or sight impairment or hearing impairment, it really starts to add up, and I think in the design community we think only in terms of people who are fully able bodied and we don’t think about the fact that these other people can be customers. You’re shutting out all these people and you say, “Those people aren’t my customers.” If your site isn’t accessible, then no, they’re never going to be your customers. It’s just the right way to do things.

 

Jonathan:           

The funny thing, John, is, to get back from the start of this conversation where Jackie was talking about these magazine sites. There’s a whole group of them, isn’t there Jackie? They can’t be very accessible can they Jackie? As a normal person you don’t really use them.

 

Jackie:  

They’re not at all. No one really enjoys visiting them. They’re going there because there’s a piece of content that they really want to read, and that’s the hook. That gets you to tolerate all the bad behavior on the site, but more and more you’re finding these articles are very short. There’s not a lot of valuable content in them. There’s a lot more ads. There’s things shifting and moving all around on the page all the time. I find more than not, many times I abandon the page before it even finishes loading.

 

Jonathan:           

They take forever to load [the web pages]. These are not from organizations that are short of resources.

 

Jackie:  

I don’t think that model is sustainable. I really don’t. I think long term that’s going to fail. That’s just my opinion.

 

John:    

Everything swings back. When I first got into web development it was very, very tail end of people worried about web standards, and I think we’ve gotten really far away from it. I think the pendulum in recent years has really started to swing back toward people caring about web standards, writing clean mark up, doing things like accessibility and making sure it’s baked into the process from the start.

 

A tool that I want to throw in here, and it’s a combo like SEO accessibility tool, but there’s one part of it that has accessibility. This is based off of the Google guidelines for what’s a quality site, and this is Varvy.com. I use this a lot. It will tell you according to the Google quality guidelines are you doing well with accessibility. There’s about five checkpoints. This is not as super in depth as any of these other tools, but you want to get the green on that as well. Any books or anything like that, that you guys … Yes, jump in.

 

Lee:      

I’ve not got a book, but it was just something about the accessibility. You know when you said that back when we … We must have started at the same time. A lot of developers were all about the standards, and then over years we seem to have gone away from that, and I think one of the biggest issues with that was the fight with Internet Explorer, because Internet Explorer was such a bollocks to try and make things work for. You had to break the rules to be able to make things work.

 

Jackie:  

Horrible.

 

Lee:      

Exactly. We’re now in a society where Chrome and Firefox are huge browser. Chrome especially has got a huge percentage. Even Microsoft are ashamed of Internet Explorer. They’ve launched Edge, which is not terrible, which is amazing to be able to say that. I think actually, the most annoying browser in the world is now Safari. Come on now. What are you doing?

 

John:    

I agree, 100%.

 

Lee:      

Seriously. This now means that most people can see their website and it will look the same in most browsers because most browsers are doing well following the rules themselves so that things will look good. I’m not saying that you can just do one set of code and not check. You do have to still check, but making thing accessible is a hell of a lot easier now with web kit browsers, etc, with the standardization that’s going on across all these browsers, etc. Naughty apple, catch up guys, but seriously. It is making accessibility easier. As developers, maybe we should all be revisiting this with a little bit less stress because hooray, IE is dead. I removed it from my contrast last year saying, “If you want IE you pay a very hefty IE tax.”

 

Jackie:  

Can you imagine how much time has been wasted supporting that, writing work arounds for older versions of Internet Explorer. What a waste.

 

Lee:      

Why?

 

Jonathan:           

Why?

 

John:    

I will say this though, and I’ve dealt with projects like this, depending on what it is like if it’s for a government agency, if it’s for certain types of non-profits, if it’s for some sort of local government thing, there’s a certain point that you have to support stuff back to, and that might be like IE8 or IE9. There’s certain accessibility tests that you have to pass in order for your project to be considered delivered.

 

Jackie:  

They’re just going to be more expensive now.

 

John:    

That’s fine. Go ahead.

 

Lee:      

I’ve done a couple of those, but yes, Jackie is right. They’re expensive. We got paid well to do them. It was IE7.

 

John:    

Oh man. I feel for you.

 

Jonathan:           

I don’t even know how to do it myself. You can knock it back, Lee. You put a nightmare in my mind there. You bugger. Sorry.

 

John:    

Any other resources that you guys would recommend for accessibility?

 

Jackie:  

Other than what we’ve said, no. I would say go to one of those sites and run your site through it and take a look and then get your notepad out and start working through it.

 

Lee:      

I’d share a little bit of advice I guess because I’m a bit guilty of this one. To the coders out there, hey. When you’re doing code just try and remember what is readable text. One of the things I’m very guilty of in the past is doing the display before content in CSS and display after, and then popping in to make it look as per the design, but actually it isn’t visible text as far as Google is concerned, as well as a visual reader.

 

There are a few things. Just be a nice human, be a nice developer, and if there are things that you can do, which avoid using the display text before or after a CSS, then there’s a good tip because I’m guilty of that and I need to stop doing it.

 

John:    

That’s a good tip. I did not know that. See, I learned something today.

 

Lee:      

Google can see it in the CSS, but that’s not really very helpful, and it can’t see it in context because Google is not going to extrapolate and look for the class and then decide, “That must be in context with that particular paragraph.” It’s a bad thing to do for accessibility, and guilty as charged.

 

Jackie:  

The last one was don’t just do click here, read more. Make sure that you’ve got more detail, more meat in that, so that basically for a screen reader, and for Google, for SEO, they know what that link is because think about it. SEO, the link actually is really important and if your link is click here, that doesn’t really say anything.

 

John:    

I agree with that.

 

Jackie:  

There’s ways around that now. You can do screen reader text. You can say click here for, and put all this other for and the whole explanation in a screen reader text so that’s read out on a screen reader but it’s not visible on the site.

 

Jonathan:           

That’s one next three weekends taken up. Sorry.

 

Lee:      

We’re you being sarcastic? I couldn’t quite detect.

 

Jonathan:           

I probably will. There we go. My might got a few sites I probably will have to improve. We’re really happy improving them, isn’t we John?

 

John:    

Yes. Slowly but surely. I just know a some things we need to clean up. There we go, something to do.

 

Jonathan:           

It’s an endless list, isn’t it John?

 

Lee:      

I guess people could also make themselves aware of … I don’t know how to say it. Is it Aria or Aria? A-R-I-A.

 

John:    

Aria roles, aria.

 

Lee:      

Aria roles, etc. That’s a good thing for things like links, etc. I don’t know of any books out there or any online courses, but it’d definitely be a good thing for people to, especially for developers, people building their website, to be more aware of because that’s going to give me a description of what’s going on etc, what’s related to what, etc. That’s very good.

 

Jonathan:           

I think it’s great.

 

Lee:      

I use it minimally to be honest. I don’t know much about it other than I use it on links because I know it’s good for links and that’s about it.

 

Jonathan:           

I think a lot of, just to wrap up, I think a lot of the stuff a part from the contrast and some of the other, when you’re getting into those last couple percent things. I think a lot of the things we discuss, and I don’t know if you, Lee and Jackie, would agree, and John, it’s a lot of the stuff we talked about really directly affects SEO in a way and how Google will see it. It really does. If you can’t clean it up I would be very aware it. It will considerably help on the SEO to some extent, wouldn’t it?

 

Lee:      

That’s why I like Jackie’s statement about Google is also deaf and blind.

 

Jackie:  

That was from Rian. I’m just quoting her.

 

Lee:      

I’m quoting you quoting her.

 

Jackie:  

That is very impactful when you hear that. You think of it you go, “Oh, okay.” You’re writing your content and you want Google to see it and rank it. Make it so that Google knows what it is.

 

Jonathan:           

All right then John. Let’s wrap this show up, shall we John.

 

John Locke:        

Just want to remind everyone we had almost 4,000 downloads last month. That was definitely awesome. If you’re getting value from this show be sure to go to iTunes, write a detailed review. We’re trying to get to triple digits. I met somebody just the other day at a local Meetup that came to the Meetup because they heard the podcast. We’re meeting a lot of people out in the wild. If you see us just walking around town just come up and say hi, but definitely leave us a review. Maybe we’ll read it on air. There you go. We’ll go around the room. Everybody tell us where you can find you. Jackie, how do we get ahold of you?

 

Jackie:  

You can find me at jackiedelia.com, and I usually hang out on Twitter at @JDelia.

 

John:    

Awesome. Lee, where do you we find you?

 

Lee:      

You find me on Twitter. That’s Lee Jackson Dev, and the website is leejacksondev.com, which will change, but it will be a three in one redirect at some point.

 

John:    

Very good. Jonathan, how do we get a hold of you?

 

Jonathan:           

It’s quite easy folks. You can find me on Twitter @jonathandenwood or you could e-mail at [email protected] That’s the way to find me.

 

John:    

Very good. You can find me on my website, which is lockedowndesign.com, or you can find me on Twitter @Lockedown_. For WP-Tonic, we’re saying adios. Be sure to catch us … Who’s on our next episode? Let me look this up. Hold on. Oh, our next episode is going to be Carrie Dils. We’ve already taped it on YouTube, but if you’re listening on the podcast that’s the next one that you’re actually-

 

Jonathan:           

The queen of Genesis.

 

John:    

Our next actual proper guest is going to be Rachel Andrew. We’re going to interview on the 18th.

 

Jackie:  

Oh my goodness. I’m excited about that. CSS Grid, here we come.

 

John:    

There you go. Peace out. Adios.

 

Jonathan:           

Bye folks.

 

Jackie:  

Bye y’all.

 

Transcript of Episode 155: Accessibility is Part of the Job was last modified: by

Web Accessibility Links Mentioned During the Show

Download the PDF of links mentioned during the show on web accessibility.

Rethink.fm Episode #7: Why Web Accessibility Matters

http://rethink.fm/podcast/episode-7-why-web-accessibility-matters/

WP Accessibility plugin

https://wordpress.org/plugins/wp-accessibility/

AChecker

http://achecker.ca/checker/index.php

Browse Aloud

https://www.texthelp.com/en-gb/products/browsealoud

A11y Project

http://a11yproject.com/resources.html

Accessible Ready Themes on WordPress.org

https://en-gb.wordpress.org/themes/tags/accessibility-ready/

W3C Validator
https://validator.w3.org/

WAVE Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool

http://wave.webaim.org/

wA11y – The Web Accessibility Toolbox

https://wordpress.org/plugins/wa11y/

Colorblind Web Page Filter

http://www.color-blindness.com/2006/04/10/colorblind-web-page-filter/

ARIA Roles

https://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria/roles

A11y Toolbar

https://github.com/downzer0/a11y-toolbar

Using JAWS to Evaluate Web Accessibility

http://webaim.org/articles/jaws/

Varvy

https://varvy.com

 

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